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Thread: I got tired of

  1. #1
    Axetastic etechstan's Avatar
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    I got tired of

    I got tired of seeing never next to the title of this forum.

  2. #2
    AT Member LeMašonAmericain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by etechstan View Post
    I got tired of seeing never next to the title of this forum.
    I feel ya!

  3. #3
    Axellent Member The Galaxist's Avatar
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    here is my contribution to this thread , common Axetalk, there must be more pedal builders out there !

  4. #4
    Axeaholic YeahDoIt's Avatar
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    I made a fuzz box once. It didn't always work but when it did I really liked the tone.
    Video playing acoustic guitar at the beach http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r4OTqDn0JqE
    Music video - Maersk rescue from pirates, original pictures, NAVY SEAL museum www.youtube.com/watch?v=22fJQ8t8ZY8

  5. #5
    Super Moderator die Bullen's Avatar
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    atta boy Stan!

  6. #6
    Axellent Member Braindancer's Avatar
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    Here's my contribution...a bass talkbox I built for 14 bucks from a discarded stereo speaker. Out where I live, the air is so dry that foam woofer surrounds break down in about 20 years, so you see a lot of really nice audiophile stuff at the dump with speaker surrounds that have been oxidized to dust. This compression driver came from a Marsland 3-way system that had a compression-horn mid driver. I got the tubing at the local Canadian Tire (Canada's Tru Value). The throat was wide enough to accommodate a 5/8" clear PVC tube, which was ideal for my needs...I wanted this to work well with bass as well as guitar. The driver is fairly weak for a talkbox - only rated at about 40WRMS - so I don't have a lot of headroom with it. I drive it using a Roland Micro Cube 10W practice amp, and I've also used a 30W Line 6 practice amp, and while this certainly doesn't stack up to a Heil for clarity and volume (the Heil can literally damage your lungs if you close your mouth around the tube at high volume levels), it's plenty loud for home recording and moderate-volume club playing, and I think it's a better BASS talkbox than the Rocktron Banshee. I made 2 of these at once since I didn't trust the horn to survive a smoke-test with my 30W Line 6, and ended up selling the other one.



    I spent probably $250 back in the 80s on the Craig Anderton books and a bunch of supplies thinking I'd build my own custom pedals. Never happened...I just don't have the manual dexterity to do 100 tiny solder joints that I'm confident will work. But I did build something last winter that I've found very useful.

    One of the problems I've had as a hotrodder is getting tone controls right with my frankensteins...I always seemed to be popping capacitors in and out. So I solved the problem permanently by building an OUTBOARD tone control that functions like a more sophisticated version of the BC Rich/Lado type varitone circuits. I don't have a photo of it because I've simply lost it...it disappeared a month ago and I have no idea where it went. It turned out to be more useful than I anticipated. Not only does it function like a standard varitone switch and external tone control, it also has a variable greasebucket option which I'll explain below. I built it as an external tone control, but I've rarely used it for that purpose. Instead, I use it to test various tone cap/tone pot/tone circuit types to see which works best on which guitar, and I eventually install the setting I like best as the permanent tone control for that guitar or bass. I haven't once found the standard .022uF/250k or .047uF/500k tone control settings to be the ideal ones for any of my 6-strings, and I discovered that I really like .069uF tone caps in my basses over the usual .047's.

    The build is dead easy if you know your way around a guitar's control cavity.

    I started with a pair of 6-position rotary switches, a DPDT on/on switch and a handful of .022uF (or "223" designation) tone caps and 5k resistors. The key to this circuit is knowing how to wire the capacitors, and it's a simple trick. Just think "opposite of resistors". As you probably know, 2 resistors in parallel offer only half the resistance of 1 resistor. Capacitors act a little like batteries, though, so 2 capacitors in parallel offer TWICE the capacitance as 1. Useful tone-cap values usually step up in .02uF increments, so a bunch of cheap .022's are perfect for a varitone. I'm not very good at diagramming either, but it's a simple concept. Just wire the rotary switch up so that each position on the rotary adds another .022uF capacitor in parallel to the previous position, and when you're done, you've got a rotary switch that offers tone-capacitor options .022uF, .044uF, .066uF, .088uF, .1uF, and 1.2uF. Since the last option is probably useless, you might want to use it to have two .022 capacitors in *series* instead, to give you a .011uF option.

    Once you've got that wired up, with the output of the switch going to a tone pot that bleeds to ground like a normal tone control, you've essentially got a varitone. (I wired in a toggle here which allows me to select between 250k and 500k tone pots.) But there's more you can add and it's just as easy. The greasebucket tone control, which uses a .1uF capacitor to bleed only the trebles into the tone control, supposedly protecting the low frequencies from any bleed at lower volumes, is popular with Strats right now. So I decided to use the other rotary switch, with the exact same capacitor values, as part of a switchable greasebucket...it's fairly easy to figure out from one of the greasebucket diagrams on the web. You need a DPDT microswitch to switch the greasebucket section of the circuit in and out, and a 9-lug switch is best because you can use the third set of poles to switch in the 5k resistor that goes between the tone control's output and the case ground.

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