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Thread: Flat 'pancake' right angle TS connectors

  1. #1
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    Flat 'pancake' right angle TS connectors

    So,

    I am making some patch cables and I ordered some flat pancake style right angle connectors and for the life of me I can't figure out how to get them soldered up without getting it to hot and and loosening the sleeve.

    Any suggestions?

    There are no "tangs " to solder to and it pisses me off because they are switchcraft and you would think for the price they would have some tangs on there for the tip and sleeve.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Axetastic etechstan's Avatar
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    pics please
    I don't play guitar because I'm good at it, I play because it's fun!!

  3. #3
    Axetastic doublewah's Avatar
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    As Stan said, pics would help us know exactly what you mean, but I will try, based on my understanding of what you are saying...

    I am guessing that by "loosening the sleeve", you mean the insulation in the barrel?

    Personally, I prefer pancake plugs without tabs. The main thing for me is that the tip and barrel do not rotate with age, and especially when they are new.

    The downside of not having tabs on the sleeve is that you need to get it rather hot to take solder. Which gives you your problem.
    You need a heat-sink.

    A table-vise would be the ideal way to hold the plug while soldering, plus it works great as a heat-sink. Wrap the barrel in something so it doesn't get scratched.

    I don't have a table-vise, but I do have an A/B pedal footswitch that I use. I wouldn't use a pedal with electronics in it, but I have used this footswitch for years for this job. It also acts as a heat-sink.

    Once the sleeve is soldered, it won't take much heat to do the tip. And not having any tabs gives more room for when I am using heavy cable, hence my preference.

    If this helps, great. If not, then please provide pics, so I or someone else can offer some thoughts.
    I bought a relic'd guitar because I liked the way it sounded. Then I refinished it because I didn't like the way it looked.

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    Axe-honerated spellcaster's Avatar
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    First of all, welcome to the forum. We're always happy to have someone join, because everybody brings a new and fresh perspective to the table. And if we can help, we're happy to try.

    I don't pretend to be as talented with a soldering iron as some of the guys here, so I won't try to offer advice. But, a picture's worth a thousand words, (we love pictures!) so here's a look at an over the counter pancake-style right angle plug.

    This is a Marsh Amps reproduction Fender vintage speaker cable I bought when I did my 71 Twin Reverb head conversion. It's got snap-on plastic F-insignia caps. My memory of the Switchcraft version is that they used to be a chrome cap that fastened with two miniature phillips screws, but I suspect they're quite similar inside. Here's a look with the cap off......



    To me, that appears to be a standard tack-solder....Just tin your wires, tin the cleaned tip of the iron, hold the wire against the contact, and heat it for a brief moment. As soon as the solder liquifies, you're done. Less heat is better, obviously, and I think DW's suggestions about heat-sinking are good. I use a helping-hands, clipping it on to either the shaft or the tip, depending on which contact I'm soldering.



    Good luck with it. Hoping KC will chime in, as he's as good with a soldering iron as anybody I know. And when you get your cable done, tell us what it plugs into! We're interested in hearing about your gear.
    "I know just enough to be dangerous....."

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    Axe-honerated Keletcaster's Avatar
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    Thanks Spell. I like to use a little general flux on the area I am soldering to. Just a little dab. Lots of times I dip the solder in it on tough areas. Also flux the wire tip & tin the wire with a little solder. Put solder on the area minus the wire before hand Then just Put the hot tip on the 2 & weld them together it should be instant. Like pssst done If it isn't taking right away then the contaminants are fighting you. Flux is the key to great solder joints.
    Great Guitars Are A Formula Not A Logo.

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    Axetastic doublewah's Avatar
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    Oh yes, I forgot to say "Hi! Welcome to Axetalk!"

    Also forgot to mention flux. I use rosin or flux-core solder solder, so I don't add flux for most jobs. But when soldering to anything with more mass, such as a chassis or the sleeve part of these pancake plugs, I dab a bit on.

    But maybe I will start following Kele's advice, use it more often, join the big boys.
    I bought a relic'd guitar because I liked the way it sounded. Then I refinished it because I didn't like the way it looked.

  7. #7
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    I am sorry it took me so long to get back to you all. I thought I would get an e-mail when someone responded but I might not have that set up right yet.

    Thankyou for all the help.

    Yes, I have them all soldered up now. I did it by roughing up the spot where I was going to solder with some sandpaper, and using a pair of adjustable pliers as a heat sink.

    I wish I would have read these post before I started experimenting, I came up with the process after alot of trial and error and 4 ruined connectors (i practiced on a cheaper connector not the switchcraft).

    I think I have it down fairly well now. I don't have any flux but using the heatsink properly and the connector barely even gets hot.

    It is not instant like KC said but I am glad I now know it should be. I will have to get some flux for future projects.

    Looking forward to more conversations in the future.

  8. #8
    Axeaholic Hu Duck Xing's Avatar
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    Yup! When soldering a jack like that, or soldering wires to an amp chassis, I use my Dremel with the little ball grinder to rough up the spot and remove the plating. Then a small dab of liquid soldering flux, and it's a snap to do!
    Ya can't pick up a turd by the clean end

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    Axetastic etechstan's Avatar
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    I don't like that there is no strain relief to prevent the cable from mobing around and weakening the wire or solderjoint
    I don't play guitar because I'm good at it, I play because it's fun!!

  10. #10
    Axetastic doublewah's Avatar
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    A bit of a tangent, but since we are talking about right-angle guitar plugs...

    Sometimes I prefer the pancake type you are using, and sometimes I prefer this kind:
    Right Angle Male 1 4" TS Mono Phone Plug Guitar Audio Connector 6 3mm Jack New | eBay
    I bought some of these recently. I can't find them locally, and the price is pretty good.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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    I bought a relic'd guitar because I liked the way it sounded. Then I refinished it because I didn't like the way it looked.

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