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Thread: Pedalboard noise issues

  1. #1
    Axe-honerated spellcaster's Avatar
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    Pedalboard noise issues

    I've been plugging direct into my amp for a while, sorting out amp issues. Now that the amp's 100%, I want to look into a pedalboard problem. Everything works, but there's an unusually high hiss level which is audible even when all the pedals are switched off, and gets louder when any are switched on. There are five pedals in series on the board and a direct box paralleled to the output. All the pedals are powered by a OneSpot power supply. All the cabling in the board is studio quality double shielded. This board worked well in it's present configuration for about three years before the symptom showed up. Any ideas on diagnosis, short of trial and error elimination?

    "I know just enough to be dangerous....."

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    Axetastic etechstan's Avatar
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    Its that old typewriter case, mail it to 3421 Sanford Ave Stow Ohio and I will gladly dispose of it! I will even pay the shipping charges for you.
    I don't play guitar because I'm good at it, I play because it's fun!!

  3. #3
    Super Moderator die Bullen's Avatar
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    ha ha I was going to say it must be a "tweed covering issue"...

    Seriously though I can't say what the noise problem is- I don't really use effects at all except onboard ones.

  4. #4
    Axe-honerated spellcaster's Avatar
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    In truth, it's been a novel experience plugging in direct.....kind of had a John Fogerty feel to it. I find I miss the digital delay at times, and very occasionally the raw warmth of the 59 Bassman pedal, but I've been back-burnering this project for a while. I guess it's time to start pulling the pedals off the board one at a time and start testing them individually inline.
    "I know just enough to be dangerous....."

  5. #5
    Axe-honerated zontar's Avatar
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    I think I've seen that exact typewriter case--why didn't I think of that--I'd have a great case for a pedal board--but now the case is long gone.
    (well it was never mine...)
    I've been a pilgrim on this earth, since the day of my birth, I'm a long way from my home.

  6. #6
    Axeaholic YeahDoIt's Avatar
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    To find the device that makes noise you might remove each component one by one. Notice if the hiss disappears.
    Video playing acoustic guitar at the beach http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r4OTqDn0JqE
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  7. #7
    Axeaholic Teleblooz's Avatar
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    When I've had noise issues with pedalboards in the past, it usually ends up as one of 3 things:

    1. The cabling has gone bad. This is most often due to cheap cables/connectors and I see that you have the good stuff, but solder connections can still go bad. It's a simple matter to swap out one cable at a time to check.
    2. The power supply has gone south. Conventional wall-wart type transformers are notorious for this, although the symptom is usually 60-cycle hum in my experience. The only solution is to replace it. I've been using 1-Spots (which are NOT conventional wall-warts) for years now with no problems at all, so it's not my first place to point the finger.
    3. One of your pedals is dying or has some internal problem. Do as YDI suggests and remove one at a time from the chain.
    I crawl like a viper through these suburban streets.

  8. #8
    Axetastic etechstan's Avatar
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    Take your rig into another room of the house to see if there is an electrical issue in that circuit. Could be a light or something too. Try the pedal board in a different amp. There are many factors that can cause this and can be in the pedal board or the environment around it.
    I don't play guitar because I'm good at it, I play because it's fun!!

  9. #9
    Axellent Member Dirt Rich's Avatar
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    I'd guess power supply.

  10. #10
    Axellent Member anfontan's Avatar
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    I work with telemetry receivers-tuning and repairing-in my day job, and when there is a lot of hiss and low signal strength it is often a loose or cold ground connection.
    I agree with the other posters that eliminating a pedal at a time is the best way to trouble shoot a problem like this.
    The 1 spot may not have enough current if some of your effects have a heavy current drain as well, and if you have light dimmers on the circuit you are plugging into it can also have an effect and cause issues!

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