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Thread: Lock nut reversal

  1. #1
    Axe-honerated Keletcaster's Avatar
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    Lock nut reversal

    I'm having a lot of fun with rebuilding neck's lately & after the last one turned out so well I decided to have a look at this 80's Larravee neck I actually purchased from Jean Larrivee himself way back when. It's been hanging on my shop wall forever. I used it for a short while on a strat project with a replacement nut that would substitute the locknut that it was designed for. I never liked the way it worked so back on the wall it went. I know its a pointy but the neck is a grade A piece of wood that feels as good as they come. The profile is very similar to an old fender neck. It's to nice to not be used so I have decided to build something out of it I can use. I have no intention on having any guitar with a locknut. I haven't been into Floyd Rose stuff since the early 90's. My intention is to change this neck into a standard nut style. I removed the fretboard & stripped off the finish. The heal was wider then a standard 2 3/16 fender so I have shaved it down to the standard size. I got another Maple board & some frets coming from Stu Mac for it. I will search out an interesting body for it when it is done. I de-pointied the headstock. Nothing crazy I just removed the eye removing edge's. Lol!! I see a lot of locknut necks come up cheep because they have fallen out of favor so this project it to learn how I can benefit from picking those up. For fifty buck Canadian & doing something I love to do I should end up with a pretty nice quality neck to build something unique & cool with down the line. Here go's
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  2. #2
    Axe-honerated spellcaster's Avatar
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    This looks like an interesting project.

    How do you think it'll work out using a standard nut when the strings are so offset from a straight pull? Do you foresee any need for some sort of string bar or trees to keep the strings from popping out of standard nut slots?

    I'm looking forward to seeing your progress on this one.
    "I know just enough to be dangerous....."

  3. #3
    Axe-honerated Keletcaster's Avatar
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    That's a good question. To me the radical angle on the headstock should provide all the break angle I should ever need. I have seen these with standard nuts before on there hard tail versions. It worked with the substitute nut I used so I guess we will see.
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  4. #4
    Axe-honerated Keletcaster's Avatar
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    OK I finally received My Maple board from Stu Mac this week so today I went at installing it. As you can see the boards are over size so I have marked it out & trimmed it off with my scroll saw on the outside of the line to ensure that I don't cut to narrow. I will file & sand down the excess after it dries.


    Now with my reference spot for my nut position predetermined before I removed the old fretboard. I position the new board on a dry run & pin it with cut off paper clips. I will run them through the board & into the neck with a drill. Glue is slippery stuff & to do this without pinning will have you pulling your hair out trying to stop the board from skating around.


    Here it is pinned glued & zap strapped until tomorrow. The last process I dont have much time for photos as I am trying to get it strapped down before the glue dries. Zap straps are the best tool for the job doing this. I have clamped before but with lesser results. You are able to evenly strap the neck from one end to the other. Now I wait until tomorrow to see the results.
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  5. #5
    Axe-honerated spellcaster's Avatar
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    Impressive. There's a lot more to the process than it might appear. You do some nice work, KC.
    "I know just enough to be dangerous....."

  6. #6
    Super Moderator die Bullen's Avatar
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    You got that right that this is impressive!

    I want KC to make me a guitar!

  7. #7
    Axe-honerated Keletcaster's Avatar
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    Thanks guys. I'm flattered. & Lowell I would love to build you a guitar.
    Great Guitars Are A Formula Not A Logo.

  8. #8
    Super Moderator die Bullen's Avatar
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    the praise is certainly deserved!

  9. #9
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    This morning I removed all the Zap straps. They always look so ugly in the beginning.


    So I went to work with a sanding board evening up the sides. Its important to keep the block flat & watch for when you get far enough down that you start seeing it blend into the neck.You don't want to go to far just till you hit the shaft. I use 80 grit on the sanding block in the beginning for this task. Then I hand sand with 120 to finish the blending & sand away any left over glue.

    You can see that it doesnt take long for the sandpaper to take care of that excess glue & make it look like it should.

    Last edited by Keletcaster; 08-14-2016 at 05:25 PM.
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  10. #10
    Axe-honerated Keletcaster's Avatar
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    I don't get to crazy with the sanding yet as I have all my inlays to go in 1st. so I now install my side dots.


    Next are the green Abalone markers


    I only got as far as sanding it to 120 today. As I said in the beginning of this thread that I felt that this neck felt like an old Fender neck so I gave it an old school 7.25 radius to go all the way with that. I got a lot of work left but its starting to shape into a great neck. I'm stopping for the day it's just to hot out to do any more.


    Great Guitars Are A Formula Not A Logo.

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