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Thread: Songs you're learning or working on

  1. #101
    Axe-honerated zontar's Avatar
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    When I taught guitar the school also had organ students--and that was a standard one that intermediate to advanced students learned.
    I got sick of it at one point, but now I haven't heard it in years.

    Should be fun.
    I've been a pilgrim on this earth, since the day of my birth, I'm a long way from my home.

  2. #102
    Super Moderator die Bullen's Avatar
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    listen to Liberace playing it double time- amazing player

  3. #103
    Axe-honerated zontar's Avatar
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    First time I heard a student play it I thought they were going to play Iko, Iko--I misheard the introduction.



    See different songs.
    I've been a pilgrim on this earth, since the day of my birth, I'm a long way from my home.

  4. #104
    Axe-honerated spellcaster's Avatar
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    My current project is to finish learning a song that I started toying with back in the mid 80's. I ended up dropping it when the band broke up shortly thereafter (due to a drummer who was too interested in tuning up for gigs with a dozen beer). Really wish we'd been able to follow through with it, because we had a chick singer who could just nail Crissy Hynde tunes. Anyhow, I was watching a Pretenders video earlier, discovered that it made a lot more sense played in the right key (I'd started learning it in the wrong key for some reason), and next thing I knew I right into it. One of those songs that a Tele's so right for......

    "I know just enough to be dangerous....."

  5. #105
    Axe-honerated spellcaster's Avatar
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    I've been doing something different over the last few days. There are lots of songs that I learned by ear, and just chose a key that made the chord sequence easy to play, or put the song into my best vocal range. What I'm finding, more and more, is that there's a need to learn the songs in the original key......There are songs, such as Beatles stuff, that have strange chords that are physically impossible or impractical in other keys, such as Here, There and Everywhere. From the 'net, this bit of wisdom regarding the F#m7b5.
    "The F#m7 in the verses are played as F#m7b5 on the Beatles' recording:
    F#m7b5
    2-x-2-2-1(0)
    I'd never have found it on my own.
    "I know just enough to be dangerous....."

  6. #106
    Axe-honerated zontar's Avatar
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    I've been working on a bass riff idea--I want to add other stuff to it, but have it start with just bass.
    I have the basic idea, but I keep changing stuff around--so I wrote out what I had & changed that a bit & the went to record it & spontaneously while playing I changed it again.
    It's missing something, but I think I got it figured out tonight--so I'll re-record it and then work on the other parts--which might include mandolin.
    I've been a pilgrim on this earth, since the day of my birth, I'm a long way from my home.

  7. #107
    Axetastic doublewah's Avatar
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    Thanks Spell. That's a cool way to play F#m7b5.

    Just a tip though. Try not to think of a m7b5 as a m7 chord. Think of them as entirely different chords. They both have a minor 3rd and a flat seven. The difference is the 5 being a natural (m7) or flat (m7b5).
    The point is that they come from different scales, and their use can tell the ear whether we are likely going to a major chord or a minor chord.

    The two-five-one chord progression is very popular in jazz, and also used in other forms of music.
    There are major two-five-ones, and minor two-five-ones...

    I'm sure you are familiar with Downchild Blues Bands' version of "Flip Flop and Fly"? It's basically a 12 bar blues with a two-five-one progression as we get tot the turn-around. If the song is in Bb, the two-five-one is Cm7 - F7 - Bb. When we hear or play the Cm7 we can be pretty sure that the next two chords will be F7 and then Bb, and that the song (or this section of the song) is in Bb.

    A minor two-five-one does a similar thing, but it would use the m7b5 chord instead of the m7 chord.
    So in the key of Am, it would be Bm7b5 - E7 - Am
    In the key of Em, it would be F#m7b5 - B7 - Em

    I do a few songs in Am that use the minor two-five-one. Quite a few, actually. One is Black Orpheus.
    So I can use a two-bar vamp of Bm7b5 - E7 - Am at any time in the song. As an intro, or a tag between solos or chorus, or as an outro.

    I also do a few songs in Em that use the minor two-five-one. One that comes to mind is Dean Martin's "Sway".
    And the same thing. I can use the minor two-five-one to vamp at any time I need. And now I will try your Beatles chord form.

    If you ever hear anyone say "half-diminished" chord, it uses the same notes as the m7b5. Music theorists say that they are different chords and perform different functions. But I cannot remember the difference at the moment, and the lines are being blurred. So many people use the two terms interchangeably these days that they are becoming synonyms. My point is that, right or wrong, you will hear both terms for that chord you show above. But if you can think of the m7b5 (or half-diminished) as an entirely different chord from the m7 chord (as different as a minor is from a major chord), I think it will help any time you encounter the m7b5 chord.

    Here is an exercise I use with my students to hear chords.
    This is not a musical progression. It is a series of chords where one note changes at a time:

    C major (C)
    x-3-5-5-5-x

    C major 7 (Cmaj7)
    x-3-5-4-5-x

    C dominant 7 (C7)
    x-3-5-3-5-x

    C major 7 (Cmaj7)
    x-3-5-4-5-x

    C major (C)
    x-3-5-5-5-x

    then

    C major (C)
    x-3-5-5-5-x

    C minor (Cm)
    x-3-5-5-4-x

    C minor, major 7 (CmMaj7)
    x-3-5-4-4-x

    C minor 7 (Cm7)
    x-3-5-3-4-x

    C minor7flat5 (Cm7b5, C half-dimished)
    x-3-4-3-4-x

    C diminished (Cdim, Cdim7)
    x-3-4-2-4-x
    I bought a relic'd guitar because I liked the way it sounded. Then I refinished it because I didn't like the way it looked.

  8. #108
    Super Moderator die Bullen's Avatar
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    Emilia Polka

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