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Thread: Top 5 Myths About Learning Guitar

  1. #11
    Super Moderator die Bullen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zontar View Post
    a $20,000 guitar might hold it's value better percentage wise
    Do you think is is true? I'm not so sure

  2. #12
    Axe-honerated zontar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by die Bullen View Post
    Do you think is is true? I'm not so sure
    I was referring to percent--and if it's the right guitar percentage wise it can hold the value better than a cheap guitar.
    So as a comparison--let's say you buy a $300 guitar --when you go to sell it you would probably only get about $100 for it.
    Maybe $150.
    So that's selling it for 33-50%--but probably closer to 33%
    So that's a loss of between $150-200 based on what you paid for it.

    A $20,000 guitar should easily fetch at least $10,000 used--if not more
    So if you sold it for 50% of what you paid--that's still $10,000--so a bigger loss that way.
    But you should be able to get more for it--unless the condition is poor.
    so let's say $12,00-15,000--that's a higher percent than the $300 guitar--but your loss is still larger in actual dollars.

    My numbers are based on what I see guitars go for locally and online.
    It is possible your location will have different values.
    But the principle remains the same.
    I've been a pilgrim on this earth, since the day of my birth, I'm a long way from my home.

  3. #13
    Super Moderator die Bullen's Avatar
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    Regardless, one advantage beginners nowadays have is you can actually get a fairly good playing guitar in the $100-200 price point as long as it is set up properly. It was not like that when guys our age started playing

  4. #14
    Axe-honerated zontar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by die Bullen View Post
    Regardless, one advantage beginners nowadays have is you can actually get a fairly good playing guitar in the $100-200 price point as long as it is set up properly. It was not like that when guys our age started playing
    Maybe US $
    In Canada I would shy away form $100--except if it is one of those lower priced models being sold used.

    Certainly though the cheaper stuff out there now is better than it's ever been.
    But there is still some crap out there too.
    So be aware of that--but easy to pick up a great deal.

    However my main point was a response to the idea that an expensive instrument will often hold its value more--well yes it often can--but even if the percentage is better--the total loss can me much more.
    So there is a potential tradeoff there.

    I also mentioned resale value has never been a concern to me--I never bought any gear to re-sell it, although I realize sometimes people get into a place where they need to sell their gear.
    I've been a pilgrim on this earth, since the day of my birth, I'm a long way from my home.

  5. #15
    Axe-honerated zontar's Avatar
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    Myth 4--that beginners should play with light strings...
    Again this is something I agree with as the myth commits a one size fits all fallacy.
    Try different gauges--see what works

    I started on Classical--so nylon strings with less tension, but bigger diameter.
    I still got blisters & callouses a first.

    When I started on electric I had 9s--and at one time wound up with 11-50 due to asking my Dad to picking up some strings for me.
    Well for a guy my size at the time--those strings were ginormous--and I was trying to learn hammer ons & pull offs--and I did--but it was tricky & extra work
    But I changed them--I used the 11 as a B, the B as the G, etc--and the low E (50) is on the Baux II--(so it is an old string)
    Ironically that guitar once again has 11-50 gauge on it as it is my LP Copy that I modded & set up to use for slide guitar...
    I've been a pilgrim on this earth, since the day of my birth, I'm a long way from my home.

  6. #16
    Super Moderator die Bullen's Avatar
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    Personally I think starting with strings that are too light can lead to other bad habits

  7. #17
    Axe-honerated zontar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by die Bullen View Post
    Personally I think starting with strings that are too light can lead to other bad habits
    But can you set a specific string that is "Too light" for everybody?
    That was his point.
    what is too light for the big guy is different than the young child.
    the big guy uses 10s or 11s so he can feel the string--makes sense to me.
    He might even want to use 11s or 12s

    But for the small child a 10 is not too small--and a 9 likely isn't.

    then again Billy Gibbons apparently uses 8s--and gets great tone and plays quite well.

    So when starting I wouldn't set a string size as the limit--but base it on the student.
    If they are struggling with a string size is it too light or too heavy?
    much more important in my mind.
    I've been a pilgrim on this earth, since the day of my birth, I'm a long way from my home.

  8. #18
    Super Moderator die Bullen's Avatar
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    Can you imagine what nylon 9's would be like?

  9. #19
    Axe-honerated zontar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by die Bullen View Post
    Can you imagine what nylon 9's would be like?
    Well with nylon strings it isn't really done by size but by tension.
    But a nylon 9 would be kind of weird...
    I've been a pilgrim on this earth, since the day of my birth, I'm a long way from my home.

  10. #20
    Axe-honerated zontar's Avatar
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    Ok so myth #5--the one I would take the most exception to.
    But I don't wholesale disagree eitehr.

    Myth #5 is that it is necessary to learn to read music.
    Well it's not necessary in certain contexts--and actual standard notation would not appear in many contexts--certainly.
    And he does mention contexts in which it is necessary.

    I have learned songs in a variety of ways--sometiems a combination of these-standard notation, tab, learning it by ear., chord charts, someone showing me, from books, videos, in person, etc.

    But my concern here is then people will limit themselves.
    And while he mentions there are many pro guitarists who don't read music--there are a lot --including in rock music-- who do.

    So if you have played for some time & don't need to read music to do what you do--that's fine.
    But if you are starting--why limit yourself?

    That's my bit about it.

    I'm not saying to force it on everybody, but why limit yourself when you don't have to?
    I've been a pilgrim on this earth, since the day of my birth, I'm a long way from my home.

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