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Thread: Top 5 Myths About Learning Guitar

  1. #1
    Axe-honerated zontar's Avatar
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    Top 5 Myths About Learning Guitar

    So did he miss any that should be top 5?
    Disagree with any?
    Any other thoughts?



    I'll share my thoughts as well...
    I've been a pilgrim on this earth, since the day of my birth, I'm a long way from my home.

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    Axe-honerated spellcaster's Avatar
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    The guy in the video has some valid points.....But.....I find the narrative overly- wordy, and he's tough to listen to: Too overly-expressive (sometimes in the wrong places) and the tendency to wave his hands around distracts from what he's trying to say.

    I do agree that newbies can skip the acoustic and start on an electric (I did) and you can start on electric without having an amplifier (I did). I also agree it's probably not important that a novice player learns to read music (I taught myself to read music and eventually discovered it was a waste of time for the genres of music I was interested in....And, in my experience, reading from sheet music can make you dependent on it. Learning by ear has served me better in the long run)

    So, there's an element of truth in what he says....He just delivers it in a way that annoys the hell out of me. There's nine minutes of my life I'll never get back.
    "I know just enough to be dangerous....."

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    Axe-honerated zontar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spellcaster View Post
    So, there's an element of truth in what he says....He just delivers it in a way that annoys the hell out of me. There's nine minutes of my life I'll never get back.
    Mostly I agree with him--I guess I didn't find him as annoying though.

    As to his points--I certainly agree with #1--there are pros & cons to starting on acoustic steel string, classical or electric.
    It seems to make sense to start with what matches what you want to play--and if you don't know--well then it shouldn't matter which you start with.
    But the guitar itself should also be in good condition and an appropriate size for you.
    (For the record I started on classical--which was helpful in some ways--but I wanted to rock--so once I got an electric I barely ever touched the classical at first--but gradually I came back to it--and I still own it & still play it--and I recorded with it recently--essentially using it for the bass part in a mellow version of Led Zeppelin's Communication Breakdown.)
    I've been a pilgrim on this earth, since the day of my birth, I'm a long way from my home.

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    Super Moderator die Bullen's Avatar
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    I also pretty much agree with him but since SC warned me about his wordy delivery, I simply skipped ahead to the points where the pink text were to tell me where the next myth started

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    Axe-honerated zontar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by die Bullen View Post
    I also pretty much agree with him but since SC warned me about his wordy delivery, I simply skipped ahead to the points where the pink text were to tell me where the next myth started
    And missed his description?
    That's kind of the point...
    I've been a pilgrim on this earth, since the day of my birth, I'm a long way from my home.

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    Super Moderator die Bullen's Avatar
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    I think I got what I needed

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    Axe-honerated zontar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by die Bullen View Post
    I think I got what I needed
    Maybe, but you'll never know for sure.


    As for his second myth-about having to get an amp to learn-certainly an amp helps when playing with others--and playign through an amp at home can be fun (& loud as well)--but I do play often without plugging in.
    Advantages include learning to not rely on an amp or effects for how I sound.
    Listening to my technique without distractions
    And some amp settings & some effects can cover up poor technique.

    I once had a discussion on another forum where one guy was a believer in this myth
    He thought it was a waste of time to play an electric without plugging it in.
    He was right that i is good to practice how to use the amp & pedals--true if you use them.
    But he missed the boat on the rest of it.
    When I taught I suggested my students who played electrics to spend some time playing though their amp and some time without it.

    Now if you are practicing for a performance I find it helps to practice as close as possible to how you will play in the performance--but if that is not possible--unplugged practice is always better than none at all...
    I've been a pilgrim on this earth, since the day of my birth, I'm a long way from my home.

  8. #8
    Super Moderator die Bullen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zontar View Post
    And some amp settings & some effects can cover up poor technique.
    This is really a problem with a lot of players. I used to go to jam sessions and some of these guitar players had no sense of time. So they just distorted themselves as much as possible and "led the band " (into a ditch)

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    Axe-honerated zontar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by die Bullen View Post
    This is really a problem with a lot of players. I used to go to jam sessions and some of these guitar players had no sense of time. So they just distorted themselves as much as possible and "led the band " (into a ditch)
    ANd yet I had a troll saying that distortion reveals your mistakes--well it depends on the settings.
    I've used that trick myself to cover things up.

    But practice with & without---if you can't get it to sound good without an amp & effects--then work on it until you can.
    The amp & the effects should embellish, not hide
    I've been a pilgrim on this earth, since the day of my birth, I'm a long way from my home.

  10. #10
    Axe-honerated zontar's Avatar
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    The third myth--I agree--buy the best you can afford--not necessarily the most expensive--but the best.
    If for one person that's a lower priced Epi or Squier --hen so be it--if for another it's an expensive guitar--don't be afraid to do it.
    the resale value point is a good one--although there is a point of no return there.
    a $20,000 guitar might hold it's value better percentage wise--but even if you re-sell it for $19,000 you are still losing over $1000 in the deal.
    I'm sure that cut off point is less than $20,000--just wanted a high amount to make the point obvious.

    (& resale value has never been a factor in any of my purchases.)
    I've been a pilgrim on this earth, since the day of my birth, I'm a long way from my home.

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