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Thread: Effects: Likes and dislikes

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    Axe-honerated spellcaster's Avatar
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    Effects: Likes and dislikes

    What effects do you particularly like and use most of the time?
    How about effects that you rarely or never use?

    I'm a big fan of Fender amp Reverb, and use it all the time.

    I'm not so enthused with Tremolo and almost never use it.

    I don't like effects pedals because of the noise they add and almost never plug one in. Occasionally, if I need to add a little hair to the amp's tone, I use a BOSS Fender '59 Bassman pedal. About the only other one that I use once in a while is a Danelectro Octave pedal.

    So, tell us, what are your effects likes and dislikes.....
    "I know just enough to be dangerous....."

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    Super Moderator die Bullen's Avatar
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    I like the sound of a good spring reverb but never use mine.

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    Axe-honerated zontar's Avatar
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    I like testing out effects--some I like the sound of it & they're fun--although I don't buy them because I wouldn't really use them once the novelty wore off.
    I like some pedals that get maligned online--like the Boss DS-1 & DOD FX53 (Both distortion pedals)--although my favorite distortion pedal is my Empress Distortion.
    I don't like the metal distortions typically--at least for my own playing--I know people who can get good sounds out of them, but they aren't my thing.
    I could link o a thread somewhere with my pedals in it.
    And mention the ones since then.

    Sometimes I play straight into the amp, sometimes I play unplugged, sometimes I use a lot of them, other times a few

    But I like my Octaver, Chorus, Dynamic Wah, EQ, & delay.

    But the pedal I use the most is my volume pedal.
    It is good for killing volume between songs, and sometimes a volume swell just sounds real cool and fits the song so well.
    I've been a pilgrim on this earth, since the day of my birth, I'm a long way from my home.

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    Axe-honerated spellcaster's Avatar
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    I'm coming to the conclusion that the main reason I avoid effects is the noise, and the loss in quality that seems to be inherent in putting anything between the guitar output and the amp input.

    I used to be involved in the audio business, and I like clean, articulate sound. I have a 70 Twin Reverb and dual 15" JBLs, and I've found that anything inline between the guitar and amp....including an electronic tuner....just isn't as good as plugging straight in. The common phrase I heard tossed around in high end home audio was "straight wire with gain", and I think it's valid with music gear too.

    I think the fact that I love Reverb is that it's built in to the amp design and it doesn't seem to contribute any noise artifacts. I suspect if I had a chance to own a Roland Jazz Chorus, I'd probably like it and use it a lot. It's a lot better as an integrated part of an amp design than chorus pedals.
    "I know just enough to be dangerous....."

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    Super Moderator die Bullen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spellcaster View Post
    I'm coming to the conclusion that the main reason I avoid effects is the noise, and the loss in quality that seems to be inherent in putting anything between the guitar output and the amp input.

    I used to be involved in the audio business, and I like clean, articulate sound. I have a 70 Twin Reverb and dual 15" JBLs, and I've found that anything inline between the guitar and amp....including an electronic tuner....just isn't as good as plugging straight in. The common phrase I heard tossed around in high end home audio was "straight wire with gain", and I think it's valid with music gear too.

    I think the fact that I love Reverb is that it's built in to the amp design and it doesn't seem to contribute any noise artifacts. I suspect if I had a chance to own a Roland Jazz Chorus, I'd probably like it and use it a lot. It's a lot better as an integrated part of an amp design than chorus pedals.
    You find a lot of signal degradation if it is onboard reverb?

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    Axe-honerated spellcaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by die Bullen View Post
    You find a lot of signal degradation if it is onboard reverb?
    No, just the opposite....Built in reverb circuitry as a part of the design seems really good. Pedals ahead of the input jack represent an additional circuit gain stage, and I find them noisier.

    I think probably a volume pedal (if you consider it as an effect) is probably the only exception to the rule....The ones I've seen and owned were completely passive and behaved well. When you start powering stuff, it starts to go wrong.
    "I know just enough to be dangerous....."

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    Axe-honerated zontar's Avatar
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    One word --Buffer...
    I've been a pilgrim on this earth, since the day of my birth, I'm a long way from my home.

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    Super Moderator die Bullen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spellcaster View Post
    No, just the opposite....Built in reverb circuitry as a part of the design seems really good. Pedals ahead of the input jack represent an additional circuit gain stage, and I find them noisier.

    I think probably a volume pedal (if you consider it as an effect) is probably the only exception to the rule....The ones I've seen and owned were completely passive and behaved well. When you start powering stuff, it starts to go wrong.
    I have to say even my Morley AB Y switch is kind of noisy

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    Axellent Member Mreilander's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zontar View Post
    One word --Buffer...
    Yes! There is a trend among pedal enthusiasts of having everything 'true bypass', but once you get past 3 or 4 pedals, you need at least one that has a buffer to maintain your signal.

    Another thing I see a lot is people using cables that are way too long for their needs. If you're over 20' total cable length, you should have a buffer in the chain.

    I'm primarily a plank to amp player, but have a small collection of effects to accomplish certain sounds. The one I have the most fun with is my Super Shifter.

  10. #10
    Axe-honerated zontar's Avatar
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    Boss Pedals have buffers built into them.
    Many TC Electronics pedals have a switch inside you can set to be a buffer.
    So have something like that first in your chain.
    And if you have many pedals a buffer in the middle can help.
    I've been a pilgrim on this earth, since the day of my birth, I'm a long way from my home.

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